Achievements and Experiences in the Election of New CPC Committees at the Township, County, City and Provincial Levels

From: English Edition of Qiushi Journal Updated: 2013-02-18 17:59
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The Institute for the Study of Party Building of the Organization Department of the CPC Central Committee

The election of new Party committees at the township, county, city and provincial levels across China is an important event in the political life of the Communist Party of China (CPC). Between December 2010 and July 2012, Party committees at all local levels across the country underwent an orderly and smooth transition from old to new in adherence to the objectives and requirements laid out by the CPC Central Committee for “formulating good reports to Party congresses, electing good leading bodies, and creating a good social atmosphere.” During the election process, local Party committees earnestly implemented the three key measures of promoting democracy, advancing reform, and observing a strict code of discipline, maintained a high sense of political responsibility, exercised strong leadership, conducted overall planning, adopted due procedures to regulate the whole change-over process, and followed through all tasks concerning the election of new Party committees. As a result, there has been widespread agreement among both officials and the public that the transition between old and new Party committees has yielded positive results due to the fact that local Party committees treated the task seriously, formulated meticulous plans, and made effective arrangements. A questionnaire survey conducted by the Research Group of the Institute for the Study of Party Building of the Organization Department of the CPC Central Committee concerning the election of new Party committees finds that 94.7% of the 10,000 respondents were satisfied or fairly satisfied with the change-over between Party committees. 

 

A township Party committee election takes place in Guzhen County, Anhui Province. On March 15, 2011, Party member delegates in Zhongxing Township voted for their new Party Committee at the Ninth Party Congress of Zhongxing Township, Guzhen County. This was the first time that the leading body of Zhongxing Township’s Party Committee was elected through a process of public nomination and direct election. / Photo by Xinhua reporter Guo Chen

First, a broader working approach was adopted to better enable the election of new Party committees to meet the requirements of the Scientific Outlook on Development. Taking the formulation of a good report to their local Party congress as an important part of the change-over, Party committees at all local levels organized for officials and the public to make proposals, solicited opinions and suggestions from all sides, thoroughly reviewed past experiences, and made scientific plans for the future. This allowed them to make the drafting of their reports to their Party congresses a process in which they clarified their thinking on development, freed up their minds, reached consensus, and gathered strength. Revolving around the underlying theme of development in a scientific way and the major goal of transforming the model of economic growth, the reports to Party congresses at all local levels highlighted the importance of improving the people’s wellbeing and presented a blueprint for scientific development tailored to local conditions. For instance, some of the reports emphasized the need to found economic development on advances in science and technology, independent innovation, and endogenous growth. Others identified promoting ecological progress and green development as the foundation for the strengthening of their provinces. Still others identified the dignity and happiness of residents as an important index of development. These reports, distinctive yet founded on reality, constitute declarations that local Party committees throughout the country have made for their administration over the next five years. They have set forth higher objectives and requirements for local Party committees in leading officials and the public in applying the Scientific Outlook on Development, and reflect the Party’s greater confidence and determination in this regard. Our questionnaire survey finds that 73.4% of respondents are confident about the prospects of economic and social development in their local areas, and believe that there is strong cohesion behind the promotion of scientific development. 

Second, the composition of Party committee leading bodies has become more favorable, with a large number of outstanding officials with experience at the community level receiving promotions. The key to success in the election of new Party committees was to build strong leadership collectives adept at leading scientific development and select energetic and capable leading bodies. Following the election of new Party committees, a large number of outstanding and youthful officials boasting political integrity and professional competence have been promoted to leading posts in Party committees at all local levels, and a group of experienced, upright, and honest leading officials who have firm political beliefs, who are able to control the overall situation, who are adept at leading teams, and who conduct themselves in a democratic fashion have become heads of Party and government organizations. This has made it possible for members of leading bodies to complement one another in terms of experience, skills, and areas of expertise, thus raising the overall functions of leading bodies by a significant margin. In addition, the leading members of Party committees have generally become younger. Members of township, county, city and provincial Party committee leading bodies are now on average 38.5, 43.8, 48.9 and 54 years old. For the first time in many years, some provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities directly under the central government have seen their municipal Party secretary under the age of 45, and some counties have seen their county Party secretary under the age of 35. Meanwhile, efforts to switch members of leading bodies between different leading positions have been increased. At present, 50.3% of the members of provincial-level Party committee leading bodies (excluding members of standing committees of Party committees in the military) have been transferred from different leading positions, including all the secretaries of provincial-level Party committees. All members of leading bodies have previously worked in lower-level organizations. Of those nominated for the standing committees of provincial-level Party committees, 63% had previously served as Party or government heads at the city or county levels, 42.5% had previously served as leading officials in universities, research institutes or enterprises, and 61.6% had begun their careers at the lower levels of the Party or government. Officials with working experience at the community level account for 51.7% of leading body members in Party committees at the city level and 66.1% of leading body members in Party committees at the county level. In the leading bodies of town and township Party committees, there are 1,658 university graduates who serve as village officials, 2,897 village officials, and 5,476 employees from enterprises and government-affiliated institutions. At the same time, the numbers of female officials and ethnic minority officials in leading bodies have both reached the ratios required by the related policies. There is widespread agreement that the newly-elected leading bodies of Party committees across the country are dedicated and hardworking, and that they are forging ahead with determination and leading officials and the public in marching towards the goal of completing the building of a moderately prosperous society in all respects. Our questionnaire survey shows that 94.3% of respondents believe that new leading bodies have been well selected or fairly well selected in this latest round of Party committee elections. 

Third, the environment for the election and appointment of personnel has been significantly improved, and the degree of satisfaction among officials and the public in this regard has been markedly increased. Working to create a strong social atmosphere that encourages people to concentrate on development with every determination, Party committees at all local levels have fostered a political environment that is characterized by honesty and integrity, fairness and justice, and that encourages people to be enterprising and achieve success. In adherence to a recruitment criterion of professional ability and moral integrity, with added emphasis on integrity, Party committees at all local levels have cultivated a culture of personnel appointment which values moral integrity, practical and pragmatic styles of work, community-level experience, and public recognition. On this basis, ensuring that honest people do not lose out and that opportunists do not win has become a social consensus, and a large number of outstanding officials who have won the trust of their organizations and the satisfaction of the people, who know local communities well, and who are adept at promoting development in a scientific way have been promoted to important positions. Party committees at all local levels have always observed a strict organizational code of discipline, provided stern guidance, exercised rigorous oversight, carried out strict appraisal, and taken stern action against misconduct. During the elections, they maintained high pressure against unhealthy practices such as jockeying for promotions and rigging elections through the buying of votes. Those who dared to cross the line and violate election rules were punished in a timely manner. This strict code of discipline ensured that the election of new Party committees was able to take place in a sound and fair environment. An appraisal of ethical standards during Party committee elections in China’s 31 provinces (including autonomous regions and municipalities directly under the central government) indicates that 98.2% of respondents believe that the elections were carried out in a sound or relatively sound manner.

Practice leads to experience, and experience foretells the future. The large-scale election of new Party committees at the township, county, city and provincial levels in close succession has enriched and deepened our understanding of the laws governing the election of Party committees. It has provided us with invaluable experience, and laid out a basic road-map for our future election work and even for our endeavors to take Party building and the organizational work of the Party into a new phase. 

I. Strengthening the leadership and policy guidance of the Party, and firmly seizing the initiative in the election of Party committees

Upholding the leadership of the Party is a fundamental guarantee for the success of Party committee elections. Following the guidelines of the CPC Central Committee concerning the elections of new Party committees at the township, county, city and provincial levels, local Party committees carried out early investigations and studies, made early plans, and conducted early election mobilization to ensure strong leadership, efficient organization, clear guidance, and detailed arrangements in regard to the elections. First, CPC committee secretaries were personally involved in the elections and assumed the primary responsibility for all tasks concerning the election of new Party committees. Leading groups and election work teams were set up throughout the country to coordinate all efforts under the leadership of departments of organization, ensuring that leadership at each level oversaw the leadership at the level below, so that a chain of responsibility extended from top to bottom. Second, in-depth investigations and on-the-spot guidance were carried out. Prior to the elections, in order to work out policy recommendations on how to carry out the election of new Party committees, the Organization Department of the CPC Central Committee carried out investigations and studies in 11 provinces (including autonomous regions and municipalities directly under the central government), held group discussions with other provinces to solicit their suggestions, and conducted extensive surveys in the form of questionnaires. During the process of the elections, the Organization Department set up 53 township, county and city liaison offices for election work, and department leaders took the lead in visiting local communities and attending local Party congresses, where they engaged in face-to-face talks with local leaders and delegates and offered them guidance. The Organization Department also sent work teams to selected localities to offer them election guidance; encourage them to engage in trials; identify successful practices for wider application; and work with them to resolve problems arising from elections. In doing so, useful experiences gained in selected localities were expanded and applied in other localities to advance election work as a whole. After the elections, initiatives to strengthen the newly-elected leading bodies politically and ideologically were carried out promptly to build upon the achievements that had been made in the elections. Third, a holistic approach was adopted to ensure that Party committees at all levels acted in a coordinated way. Local Party committees conscientiously implemented documents and policies of the CPC Central Committee concerning elections, followed due working processes, adopted strict procedures, focused on key links, and set election dates and arranged personnel in a coordinated way. This ensured that the election of new Party committees was carried out throughout the country in close succession and in an orderly and coordinated way.

It is a fact that being prepared ensures success, whereas being unprepared spells failure. By carrying out early investigations and studies and getting election work off to an early start, we were able to gain a clear picture of the situation and work out feasible plans for the elections. The key to the implementation of these plans was leadership. By strengthening leadership ideologically, politically, and organizationally, and guiding election work along in accordance with principles and policies, we were able to approach the election of new Party committees in a more predictable, proactive, and effective manner.

II. Promoting innovation through standardization and standardization through innovation, and making the election of new Party committees more procedure- and standard-based by adopting an innovative and reform-driven approach 

During the course of efforts to deepen the reform of the system for the management of officials and personnel, innovation provides us with an inexhaustible source of energy and a fundamental impetus, and standardization provides us with a fundamental approach and an important guarantee. Investigations and studies indicate that this round of elections has served as a platform for the application of reform achievements, the improvement of reform measures, and for the testing of reform outcomes. First, achievements in reform were applied in an integrated way. All localities made systematic designs on the basis of their achievements in the reform of the system for the management of officials and personnel over a number of years. On this basis, they integrated these achievements in an innovative way, and applied them in a systematic way, thereby raising the efficiency and quality of initiatives related to the election of new Party committees. Measures such as recommendation and nomination, appraisal and evaluation, multiple-candidate selection, and the relocation of officials not suited to their current positions were adopted throughout the country. Some localities adopted open recommendations and multiple-candidate elections for the heads of Party and government organizations, two-round voting, and the quantitative evaluation of performance. Others adopted a system of “three recommendations, two appraisals, two evaluations, and three switches.” Three recommendations refers to multiple-level democratic recommendation, named recommendation, and multiple-candidate recommendation via two rounds of voting; two appraisals refers to multi-purpose appraisal and misconduct appraisal; two evaluations refers to multiple-candidate evaluation and personalized evaluation; and three switches refers to the structural, recusal, and cross-field switching of officials between different posts. Our questionnaire survey indicates that 72.1% of respondents believe that the reform of the system for the management of officials and personnel was carried out satisfactorily in the election of new Party committees, and 21.4% believe that reform was conducted relatively satisfactorily. Second, priority was given to the appraisal of morality among leading officials. With top priority given to political character, appraisals of political integrity and moral integrity among leading officials were carried out across the country through various channels and in various forms, with the emphasis being placed on loyalty to the Party, serving the people, integrity, and self-discipline. Some localities implemented dedicated appraisals of morality, counter appraisals of morality, and multi-dimensional appraisals of morality, and adopted an approach in which failure in a morality appraisal equals total failure, so as to ensure that officials who are truly loyal to the Party and the people were promoted to leading positions in Party committees. In October 2011, the Organization Department of the CPC Central Committee issued the Guidelines on Strengthening the Appraisal of Morality Among Officials, providing a well-defined basis for the morality appraisal of Party and government officials. Third, the competition-based selection of officials became a commonplace practice. The competition-based selection of officials was adopted throughout the country for this round of Party committee elections, and has become a permanent mechanism and commonplace practice in the selection of personnel. Many localities worked out new methods for selecting personnel, including the open recommendation and selection of heads of Party and government organizations, the open selection of members of leading bodies, and the competition-based presentation of work reports by candidates chosen via a second round of voting. These practices represent a departure from a mode in which authorities simply select their favored candidates in favor of one in which talent compete for promotions on a level playing field. By allowing for the best of the best to be chosen, this approach has increased the level of public trust in the selection and appointment of personnel, and given officials a stronger source of motivation and drive.

Through the course of practice, we have learnt that if we are to achieve success in the election of new Party committees, we must make innovations on the basis of standardization and institute standards while making innovations, thus ensuring sound interaction between innovation and standardization. Without standardization, innovation will be a reckless endeavor; and without innovation, standardization will inevitably result in rigidity. Only by integrating innovation and standardization will we be in a position to gradually make the election of new Party committees more scientific. 

III. Expanding both electoral democracy and deliberative democracy

Intra-Party democracy is the lifeblood of the Party and an important foundation for the successful election of new Party committees. To guarantee the rights of Party members to stay informed about, participate in, and oversee Party affairs, as well as their right to vote, Party committees at all levels practiced and promoted intra-Party democracy during the entire process of drafting and deliberating reports to Party congresses, intra-Party elections, and personnel arrangements. As a result, Party members were fully motivated, and the quality of Party committee elections was improved. Our questionnaire survey reveals that 93.4% of respondents believe that democracy was well upheld or relatively well upheld during the election of new Party committees. To expand electoral democracy, the ratio of unsuccessful candidates to delegates in Party congresses, as well as the proportion of community-level delegates and delegates from among the frontlines of production, particularly those elected from among farmers and workers, were raised across the country. The proportions of unsuccessful candidates to delegates in Party congresses at the county, city and provincial levels were 21.7%, 22.3% and 28.7% respectively. Community-level delegates from the frontlines of various fields of endeavor, female delegates, and ethnic minority delegates accounted for 33.4%, 25.8% and 14.2% of the total number of delegates to provincial-level Party congresses. Candidates for heads of Party and government organizations were generally nominated at plenary sessions of Party committees or enlarged plenary sessions of Party committees via multiple-candidate nomination, recommendation, appraisal, and evaluation. In order to expand deliberative democracy, all localities worked out ways and methods to strengthen democratic decision-making by Party congresses, standing committees of Party committees, and by plenary sessions of Party committees, and established sound institutions and mechanisms for delegates to Party congresses to participate in the deliberation of major decisions. By listening to the voices of as many Party members as possible and drawing upon their opinions, Party committees were able to give consideration to the expectations and demands of the broad masses of Party members in the process of decision-making and incorporate reasonable and feasible suggestions into the reports to Party congresses, thus winning widespread support among delegates to Party congresses.

Through the course of practice, we have learnt that expanding electoral democracy and deliberative democracy is essential for promoting democracy. If we firmly grasp the promotion of both electoral democracy and deliberative democracy, we will be able to genuinely incorporate democracy into the entire process of electing new Party committees. If we genuinely promote democracy during the election of new Party committees, we will be able to greatly advance socialist democracy and further increase the Party’s capacity to govern scientifically, democratically, and in accordance with the law.

IV. Continuing to put guidance, warning, and prevention first, and preventing and correcting malpractices in the appointment of personnel with a firm fighting spirit

The observation of a strict code of discipline is an effective guarantee for the successful election of new Party committees. Giving high priority to the observation of a strict code of discipline, all localities put guidance, warning, and prevention first, and combated unhealthy practices in the appointment of personnel through full planning, careful organization, and earnest implementation. They fought malpractices with firm determination and resolution, and imposed mounting pressure to ensure that elections were carried out in a clean, honest, and fair manner. First, efforts to implement a strict code of discipline were planned and carried out hand in hand with election initiatives. As soon as work on the elections began, the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection and the Organization Department of the CPC Central Committee articulated specific disciplinary requirements in the form of “5 prohibitions, 17 bans and 5 no exceptions” to regulate election work. They convened two video conferences to make arrangements, track progress, and provide impetus for efforts to ensure that a strict code of discipline was observed, forming a strong concerted supervisory effort. Second, guidance and publicity initiatives were expanded to raise awareness of election codes. Party secretaries and heads of organization departments at all levels openly declared that they would set an example in observing a strict code of discipline. They also held numerous personal talks to clarify disciplinary requirements. Organizations whose staff members included nominees and candidates for membership in leading bodies or delegates to Party congresses were required to sign warrants to ensure that they observed the rules, thus guaranteeing that everyone involved in the elections was obliged to observe the code of discipline. The Central Commission for Discipline Inspection and the Organization Department of the CPC Central Committee held a joint exhibition on the importance of observing a strict code of election discipline. The exhibition, which comprised of around 2,100 kinds of different publicity materials and 238,000 individual items from various localities, was themed “Tightening up Election Rules and Correcting Malpractices in the Election of New Party Committees.” Third, dedicated oversight for the election of new Party committees, the first of its kind, was carried out. A multi-dimensional, whole-process framework of oversight schemes dedicated to the election of new Party committees was developed by adopting various forms of oversight, including media oversight, institutional oversight, organizational oversight, inspection tours, on-the-spot supervision, and dedicated inspection tours. A supervisory platform for receiving reports on election malpractices was also set up, comprising of a complaints hotline “12380,” and complaints via letters, in person, and on websites. Fourth, violations of election rules were met with resolute investigation and punishment. A system for investigating reports on alleged violations of election rules was instituted, ensuring that each case was handled resolutely and made known to the public. According to our questionnaire survey, the three most effective measures for “tightening up election rules and ensuring election integrity” in the election of new Party committees were the disciplinary requirements of “5 prohibitions, 17 bans and 5 no exceptions,” the principle of “putting guidance, warning, and prevention first,” and the initiative to step up oversight in key areas.

Through the course of practice, we have learnt that in practicing strict discipline in the election of new Party committees, guidance represents the foundation, oversight provides the guarantee, and punishment constitutes the most powerful weapon. If we do not provide guidance and warnings in advance, it will be difficult to impose acceptable punishments. If we do not conduct sufficient oversight, the binding force of the code of discipline will be insignificant. If we do not investigate and take punitive action against violations, the code of discipline will be useless as a deterrent. Only by placing equal emphasis on guidance, oversight, and punishment will we be able to correct misconduct, address both the symptoms and the root causes of malpractices, and ensure integrity during the course of elections. 

V. Adhering to the principle of putting people first and laying emphasis on intra-Party care

Emphasizing ideological and political work is a fine tradition of the Communist Party of China. To promote this fine tradition in the election of new Party committees, all localities continued to put people first, and provided Party members and officials with guidance, care, and help in ideological terms and with regard to their work and lives. In particular, in-depth and delicate ideological and political work was conducted among officials whose positions might be directly affected in the election, so as to ease their apprehensions and reassure them, thus ensuring a smooth transition between old and new leadership. First, positive guidance was strengthened. Policies concerning the election of new Party committees were publicized throughout the country in a timely manner through a variety of schemes, such as central group study, democratic meetings, and publicity via newspapers, periodicals, television, radio, and mobile Internet. Party officials were urged to put the cause of the Party and the interests of the people first, and to accept the choices made by their organizations and the people. These efforts laid down a solid ideological foundation for the election. Second, in-depth and personal talks were adopted as an effective means of strengthening ideological and political work during the elections. Through face-to-face talks, the broad masses of Party members and officials reached consensus with regard to election policies, guidelines concerning the appointment of personnel, and changes in the arrangement of personnel. In doing so, ideological instability was prevented or settled, and smooth progress was achieved in election work. Third, practical problems were resolved. In particular, care and assistance were provided to officials who were slated for retirement or transfer to different positions in order to reassure them and ensure that they accepted the arrangements that had been made for them. In some localities, special jobs were given to officials who were not nominated to sit on new Party committees but had yet to reach retirement age, so that they could continue to play an active role. 

Through the course of practice, we have learnt that strengthening ideological and political work during the course of Party committee elections is a concentrated embodiment of the Marxist principle of putting people first and a specific manifestation of intra-party care. If ideological and political work is performed in a careful and thorough fashion, the transition between new and old Party committees is sure to be a smooth one. If not, however, this course of transition will be hindered by obstacles and unexpected eventualities. Due to the effective ideological and political work that we carried out during this round of elections, we were able to ensure that those who received promotions forged ahead vigorously, those who were slated for retirement maintained a positive mindset, those who retained their original positions remained motivated, and those who were transferred to other positions cherished the opportunities they had been given. The result was an overwhelmingly positive situation in which thinking was unified, sound order was maintained, enthusiasm was preserved, and work continued.  

 VI. Strengthening publicity and ensuring election transparency

Strengthening publicity is essential for ensuring the successful election of new Party committees, constituting an effective means of raising public trust in the selection and appointment of officials and ensuring that elections are conducted appropriately. Responding to new conditions, new tasks, and new features in regard to the election of new Party committees, Party committees at all levels maintained the correct direction of public opinion, stepped up positive publicity, monitored public opinion, and prevented wild speculation, thus creating a good climate for the elections. First, priority was given to publicity initiatives aimed at guiding public opinion. Special organizations were set up across the country to formulate and implement election publicity programs. They fully publicized the overall plans, policies and rules, and disciplinary requirements set forth by the Central Committee of the Party and local Party committees concerning the election of new Party committees, gave extensive publicity to successful practices and measures in carrying out reform and innovation, enthusiastically propagated the new atmosphere and new social trends that elections had brought about, and provided positive responses to major hotspot issues of a sensitive nature and issues of common concern to the people. In doing so, they helped to create an upright social environment which encouraged hard working, and ensured that elections were carried out in a smooth and orderly manner. Second, publicity initiatives aimed at guiding public opinion were carried out during the entire process of the elections. Publicity plans for different stages of the elections were made throughout the country in line with the progression of election initiatives, with different publicity priorities and methods being identified for different time frames. This ensured that publicity was conducted appropriately and whenever necessary. Both traditional and new forms of media were widely used to publicize progress, work requirements, major measures, and initial achievements in regard to the election. Third, the expansion of publicity coverage was identified as a binding target. Election publicity was strengthened by addressing different groups on different levels and in different categories, thus greatly raising people’s awareness of the disciplinary rules governing the elections. To address a rapidly growing virtual society, a response mechanism was established throughout the country to promptly identify, quickly report on, and resolutely deal with changes in public opinion as reflected on the Internet. In particular, monitoring was focused on sensitive phases of the elections, such as during the vacating of positions, the holding of candidate evaluations, the deliberation of personnel appointments, and the issuing of public notices of officials to be appointed, so as to prevent and defuse the build-up, simmering, and magnification of negative information. 

Throughout the course of practice, we have learnt that strengthening publicity to guide public opinion and increase the transparency of elections is both an important means of developing aspects of the Party’s organizational work with regard to the fostering of public opinion and a good manifestation of transparency in Party affairs. The only way that we can take the element of mystery out of the election of new Party committees, constantly increase the transparency and credibility of the selection and appointment of personnel, and elect officials who can shoulder important tasks and win the people’s support is by making constant efforts to increase publicity initiatives aimed at guiding public opinion, making the entire process of the election of new Party committees open and transparent, and effectively guaranteeing the rights of Party members to stay informed about, participate in, and oversee Party affairs. 

VII. Developing model departments, building a strong contingent of officials, and making use of our huge organizational strength to ensure the smooth progression of elections

To ensure success, those responsible for seeing elections through must lead by example. Specific responsibility for Party committee elections rests with organization departments. This means that organization officials are the major organizers, participants, and implementers of Party committee elections. Developing model departments and building a strong contingent of organizational personnel constitute a reliable guarantee for the successful implementation of elections. Since the Party’s Seventeenth National Congress, departments of organization across the country have worked to strengthen themselves with emphasis on the need to act with Party spirit, stress moral integrity, and set a good example. These departments have thoroughly studied and applied the Scientific Outlook on Development, vigorously encouraged their Party members to excel in their work, and constantly contributed to the program to send 10,000 heads of organization departments into local communities. These activities have turned organization departments into models in working towards core tasks, serving overall interests, running Party affairs and department affairs strictly, practicing democratic centralism, and upholding unity and harmony. They have turned officials in the field of organizational work into exemplary figures who demonstrate firm Party spirit and political beliefs, know how to judge people and put them to good use, have an excellent working style, and who are competent, just, and honest. As a result of these activities, organization officials’ new image of being trustworthy, reliable, respectable, and caring has been established throughout the Party and society. Organization departments and officials throughout the country took concrete action and demonstrated excellent working styles to achieve solid progress in every aspect of Party committee elections. First, they set an example in being impartial and just. Adhering to the recruitment criteria of ability and moral integrity, with greater emphasis on integrity, to the reform approaches of democracy, transparency, competition, and selectivity in the selection of personnel, and to the open-minded policy of appointing people on the basis of their merits without regard to their origins, organization departments and officials judged officials fully and correctly, evaluated them objectively and impartially, and put them to good use, thus promoting healthy practices and combating unhealthy practices. Second, organization departments and officials set an example in upholding Party spirit and principles. They selected highly principled individuals with strong professional skills and good moral character to work on election-related initiatives. They strengthened the training of these people so that they could quickly familiarize themselves with the principles, policies, and procedures for elections, which ensured that they unwaveringly upheld principles, followed established standards without compromise, implemented policies to the letter, and followed procedures without being arbitrary. Third, organization departments and officials set an example in observing a strict code of election discipline. They made various public commitments through the news media and other channels that they would subject themselves to the oversight of the general public in practicing strict discipline. Organization departments at each level strived to set a good example for their subordinate departments and lead by example. It was this huge and tightly-knit organizational strength that ensured smooth progress in the election of new Party committees.


(Originally appeared in Qiushi Journal, Chinese edition, No.21, 2012)           

 

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